Tag: 上海后花园论坛

Students capitalize on summer research opportunities

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Graham Englert Senior Graham Englert poses with community members around Lake Bunyonyi outside Kabale in southwest Uganda. Englert studied the effects of disease outbreaks on healthcare workers in the region this summer.Jen Fulton, student coordinator at the Nanovic Institute, said partial or full funding was provided to 52 students to conduct research in 15 countries, including the United States.“This is the story of the Nanovic Institute,” she said. “If [a proposed project] has to do with Europe, we’re interested in helping students do their projects, whether they are from the College of Science or the College of Engineering or Mendoza or Arts and Letters or Architecture.”With the number of funded students increasing from year to year, Fulton said the Institute is on a general upward trend of student involvement. She also said the variety of research fields “really runs the gamut.”“We have students who were doing lit research on French literature,” she said. “We had some scientists over doing some internships in labs. We had some vocational students looking at doing service in Le Mans. Architecture students away on digs in Ireland.”Fulton said students today are entering a much more difficult and competitive job market where international experience and independent research can help set them apart.“I think it’s really exciting that people like us here at the Nanovic Institute are giving students the opportunity to do that independent research and do internships that may not have been a possibility for them if they didn’t have the funding to do so.”While the Nanovic Institute funded European projects, other students partnered with the Kellogg Institute to do research in Africa, Asia and the Americas.Senior Graham Englert, who conducted research throughout Uganda under a Kellogg/Kroc undergraduate research grant, said he was one of about 50 Notre Dame participants who partnered with the Kellogg Institute this summer.As students travelled to 20 different countries to conduct their research, some partnered with organizations such as WorldTeach and the Foundation for International Medical Relief while others, like Englert, conducted independent research.“I completed ethnographic research during the first two weeks in Kampala and Jinja,” he said. “For the final three weeks, I interviewed health workers with experience responding to Ebola and Marburg [virus] outbreaks in Gulu, Kabale and Bundibugyo.”Englert said he prepared for the experience by examining various global health research methods while attending global health and international development conferences at Notre Dame and other institutions.“Interning in the Crowe Laboratory at the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center sparked my interest in viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF) when I assisted a graduate student studying antibodies to Ebola and Marburg,” he said. “Reviewing literature enabled me to identify lapses in knowledge regarding the risks of responding to such outbreaks.”Due to the frequency of VHF outbreaks in Uganda, which included four Ebola and two Marburg outbreaks since 2000, Englert said the country stood out as an informative area to conduct research.“I investigated the psychological and social risks posed to health workers when responding to viral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks,” he said. “Psychological risks were defined as depression, anxiety and trauma. Social risks referred to any stigmatization or other negative repercussions from the public.”Englert said although he initially experienced anxiety at the prospects of interviewing health workers about such a sensitive topic, his first interviews in Gulu went well and left him energized for his remaining time in Uganda.Meanwhile in the United States, senior Jonathan Jou researched tendon and ligament regeneration in zebra fish through the Harvard Stem Cell Institute Internship Program partnered with the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.“I was initially looking for an opportunity to do research off campus,” he said. “I’d considered the [National Institutes of Health], I’d considered an Amgen internship with MIT, but ultimately my advisor Dr. Wingert suggested I look into the Harvard Stem Cell Institute.”Jou said the research showed him the benefits of following the proper faculty members and following one’s passion.“I learned that even though you’re 20 or 21 … you can still have big dreams,” he said. “People will embrace it as long as you can find the right audience.” Tags: Kellogg Institute, Kroc Institute, Nanovic Institute, research This summer Notre Dame students traveled both across the country and around the globe to conduct research in an array of academic fields as a result of independent searches and University-funded programs.The Nanovic Institute of European Studies, the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE) were three Notre Dame institutions that helped provide such funding.last_img read more

Africa: Serious about food

first_imgA boy smiles for the camera at Eva Orango school in Orango Island of Bijago Archipelago in Guinea-Bissau.(Image: Manoocher Deghati, Irin Photo) The record prices of staple grains in 2008 made investment in agriculture an attractive proposition for countries exporting as well as importing food. The African Union (AU), with its mix of producers and buyers, has been steadily gearing up for self-sufficiency. Shortly after Malawian president Bingu wa Mutharika became AU chair in 2010, he announced a plan to make Africa food secure in the next five years.Martin Bwalya, head of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) said the AU’s seven-year roadmap to put the spotlight on farming so as to promote food security and economic growth, and reduce poverty, was set in motion five years ago.By the end of 2010, the agriculture development plans of 18 African countries had undergone a rigorous independent technical review and were being rolled out.Over 60% of Africa’s people live in rural areas and most depend on farming for food and income. Agriculture contributes between 20% and 60% to nations’ gross domestic product.In a document called The African Food Basket, Mutharika spelt out the details of his plan, which requires countries to allocate a substantial portion of their budget to agriculture, provide farming input subsidies, and make available affordable information and communications technology.This would be possible with the help of a new strategic partnership between countries, donors, aid agencies and the private sector.CAADP, initiated in 2003, covers all the main aspects of Mutharika’s plan, including African governments’ commitment to devote at least 10% of their budgets to agriculture.Under the programme, countries draw up comprehensive investment plans that include the four CAADP pillars: sustainable land and water management, improved market access and integration, increased food supplies and reduced hunger, and research, technology generation and dissemination.“We expect the countries to contribute at least 10% of the annual expenditure budget demonstrating local ownership and responsibility,” said Bwalya.He added while development aid financing remained important, it was also crucial that countries consider measures to attract direct private sector financing to agriculture.Uganda, one of the 18 states to undergo the review process, has met about 65% of its funding requirements from its own budget.The AU’s development agency, the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad), which runs CAADP, helps countries to mobilise funds.Is achieving food self-sufficiency in five years a realistic goal? It would be a tough call, said Ousmane Badiane, director for Africa at the US-based International Food Policy Research Institute.He noted that the AU had 53 members with varying degrees of agriculture investment, development and needs, and some countries did not have the structural capacity to reach the target of food self-sufficiency for many reasons including civil conflicts.Going regionalA more realistic option, Badiane said, would be for countries with the potential to improve food production to produce enough to feed their less productive neighbours. This called for expanding regional trade and investment in transportation, including ports, railways and highways linking countries.AU members have begun to take regional economic integration “seriously”, noted Calestous Juma, professor of international development at Harvard University in his recently released book, The New Harvest.He lists regional markets as one of the three opportunities that could fortify Africa’s food security against the rising threat of climate change.There are at least eight regional economic communities, “that are recognised by the AU as building blocks for pan-African economic integration”; these include the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa, or Comesa, and the East African Community. However, “Regional cooperation in agriculture is in its infancy and major challenges lie ahead.”Regions could become food secure “by capitalising on the different growing seasons in different countries and making products available in all areas for longer periods of time”, he wrote.Both Mutharika and CAADP emphasise the development of regional markets. Mutharika listed 12 regional trade corridors identified by the various regional economic communities and suggested the AU draw up an institutional framework for each corridor.Science and technologyIn his book Juma lists advances in science and technology as another factor that could propel Africa towards food self-sufficiency, and called for more investment in the creation of regional hubs of research and innovation.Research is being carried out by groups created under Nepad, such as the Biosciences Eastern and Central Africa Network, which has been leading research on food crops, including banana, teff, cassava, sorghum and sweet potatoes. More investment in networks, especially agriculture-related ones, could produce far-reaching results.Fertiliser and subsidiesUnderuse of fertilisers has often been cited as a major cause of low production in Africa. Only four countries – Egypt, Malawi, Mauritius and South Africa – have exceeded the 50 kilograms per hectare target set by the AU, Mutharika noted in his plan.Fertiliser use in Africa accounts for less than 10% of the world average of 100 kilograms per hectare. “Just five countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Nigeria) account for about two-thirds of the fertiliser applied in Africa,” Juma said.Mutharika, who promoted the provision of subsidised fertiliser in Malawi, makes a strong case for this approach. At present 19 African countries are implementing various programmes providing fertiliser.Juma sees leaders like Mutharika, who has prioritised food security as the third factor that could set Africa on the path to food security. The Malawian government devotes 16% of its national budget to agriculture.Yet Badiane of the International Food Policy Research Institute sounded a note of caution on subsidies and cited the case of Senegal. After independence the West African country put in place an agriculture subsidy programme in the 1960s that was even more comprehensive than Malawi’s. “It had a dramatic effect on agriculture in Senegal, but by 1979 one of its [agriculture] agencies had worked up a deficit amounting to 98% of the national budget.”Carefully managed subsidies, run for a short term, and aimed at strengthening existing markets and agricultural infrastructure, were a lot more effective, he said.The Rwandan government provided free fertiliser to farmers for four years after 1994. In 1998 it wanted to hand over importing and distribution to the private sector, which unfortunately lacked capacity, so the government continued to procure and import fertiliser but left distribution and selling to the private sector.Since then, aid from financial institutions has helped the private sector build capacity to import, and at least 20 bodies now import several hundred metric tons of fertiliser, Badiane said.Way forwardThe AU’s plans for agriculture also tackle other major issues affecting food security, such as irrigation (only 4% of Africa’s crop area is irrigated, compared to 39% in South Asia); improving soil fertility (more than 3% of agricultural gross domestic product in Africa is lost annually as a direct result of soil and nutrient loss); post-harvest storage loss (sub-Saharan Africa loses about 40% of its harvest per year, against 1% in Europe); setting up databanks to share early warning information and energy.There is a high level of engagement between countries on agriculture. “They meet regularly and we support them in building evidence-based information,” CAADP’s Bwalya noted.If they stayed the course in implementing CAADP, Badiane said in five years a large number of African countries, if not food secure, would be in a much better position to feed themselves.last_img read more

Shootin’ the Shed – Wagner Farms

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In the first installment of “Shootin’ the Shed”, the Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins visits the farm of Randy Wagner. In 1975, Randy’s dad, Coy, had one of the biggest Morton Buildings built for the time. Take a look at the extras that Coy chose for the building and a request he made as the contract was being signed.last_img

Tooble.tv: 5 High School Students Stick It to the Man with Online Video Downloader

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… So, Sony BMG doesn’t want you to embed that AC/DC concert footage in your blog or grab the audio from that footage as an MP3? They’d probably have a fit if if you stored that footage as an MP4 on your computer and distributed it wherever you liked or – worse yet – remixed it to your heart’s content.Thanks to Tooble.tv, a fascinating tool that plays footsie with all kinds of copyright law, you can do all of the above and more. Only high school students would have the audacity (or sheer naivete) to pull off a stunt like this.That’s right: Tooble was developed by five high school students in Wallingford, Connecticut. We applaud their ingenuity and hope for their continued success, but we are rightfully concerned about the potential uses and the future of this product.Tooble runs as a desktop app. It makes downloading online video and converting it to MP4 files as simple as cutting and pasting a URL. The app also allows for conversion of audio tracks in the videos to stand-alone MP3s. The free version of the software runs on Mac and Windows and allows for YouTube downloads; the Pro version, priced for impulse purchases at around $6, works for a multitude of video-hosting sites.Users can search for videos or browse through the prescribed YouTube categories in the free version of the software.To test the app, we downloaded an embedding-disabled video of Johnny Cash’s The Wall, a song that details a prison experience we hope the creators and users of Tooble won’t have to replicate. Grabbing the MP4 took about a minute. We were able to open the file in our video editor and play around with it a bit. After our remixing was done, we were moreover able to upload our creation to Vimeo: Related Posts jolie odell Tags:#start#startups We’re hard pressed to think of more than a handful of legal use cases for this software. Much like P2P or BitTorrent software, this app creates a maelstrom of legal and moral questions. And calling to mind the sufferings of the Pirate Bay team and Napster, we wonder what’s in store for the kids who created Tooble.What do you think? As much fun as it is to grab others’ videos, do you think users have a legal right to be able to store, remix, and redistribute online video and audio content created by others? Is Tooble.tv essentially software that encourages and enables illegal behavior? Let us know in the comments. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

15 days ago​Mourinho rejects Lyon for Premier League return

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say ​Mourinho rejects Lyon for Premier League returnby Freddie Taylor15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveJose Mourinho has rejected the chance to return to club management with Lyon.The French powerhouse is looking for a new manager after the sacking of Sylvinho.However, Mourinho reportedly turned down any advances from Lyon.RMC Sportsays the Portuguese manager is focused on finding his way back to the Premier League.It is unclear where Mourinho would go in England, but the Tottenham Hotspur job is a possibility.Their boss Mauricio Pochettino is a candidate to leave at the end of this season.Mourinho has not worked since his sacking by Manchester United last December. last_img read more

Shareholder motions demand Imperial Oil transparency on water risk lobbying

first_imgCALGARY – Imperial Oil Ltd. shareholders are seeking to force the company to be more transparent about its water-related risks from pollution and climate change, as well as its lobbying activities and expenditures.A motion sponsored by Fonds de Solidarite des Travailleurs du Quebec, a $13.7-billion socially responsible investment firm, regarding water-related risks will be voted on at Imperial’s annual meeting on April 27.OceanRock Investments Inc., a $1.5-billion fund associated with Desjardins Group, has sponsored the lobbying motion.Imperial is recommending shareholders vote against both because it says it already provides enough transparency.Laura Gosset, engagement analyst for the Shareholder Association for Research and Education or SHARE, says her organization was turned down when it asked Imperial to voluntarily adopt more transparent policies on water risk.“As one of the largest oil producing and refining companies in Canada, Imperial’s heavy reliance on water for its production processes means the company and its investors are exposed to potential physical, regulatory and reputational water-related risks, both in terms of water consumption and wastewater disposal,” she said.Gosset is hoping strong shareholder support for the motion will encourage the company to reconsider and accept reporting practices that are being followed by many of its peers, including Cenovus Energy Inc. and Husky Energy Inc.In a regulatory filing, Imperial said its disclosures about water risk provide the “necessary transparency,” and its compliance with lobbying laws means its activities are already reported in associated lobbying registries.Meanwhile, pipeline company TransCanada Corp. is recommending investors vote in favour of a shareholder motion being considered at its annual meeting also on April 27 in Calgary.The motion calls for TransCanada to report on how it is assessing long-term risks in relation to climate change and the transition to a low-carbon economy.In a filing, it said it welcomes the opportunity to improve its disclosure.Oilsands giant Suncor Energy brought forward shareholder motions at its annual meeting in 2016 calling for it to provide more detail on its plans to thrive under tougher climate policy and on its political lobbying.Shareholders followed management’s recommendations in the votes, approving the former motion and defeating the latter.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.Companies mentioned in this story: (TSX:IMO, TSX:HSE, TSX:CVE, TSX:TRP, TSX:SU)last_img read more

Dawson Creek RCMP look to return found item to rightful owner

first_imgPolice say it is unknown as to how long the jewellery had been on the bridge or who may have lost it.The ring is very distinguishable and therefore no photo is being released at this time in the event the owner can describe it.If you believe this is your ring, you are being asked to contact the Dawson Creek RCMP at 250-784-3700. DAWSON CREEK, B.C. – Dawson Creek RCMP are looking to return a found item to its rightful owner.On June 7, Dawson Creek RCMP received a report of some found jewellery on the OldKiskatinaw River bridge.According to RCMP, what was found on the old wooden bridge is being described as a female’s wedding ring.last_img read more

Terror factories in neighbourhood waiting for weak govt: PM Modi

first_imgAyodhya/Kaushambi: Terming terrorism the biggest threat facing India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday said terror factories running in the neighbourhood are waiting for a weak government here.This is a new India which will strike terrorists in their den, within the border and outside it, he said at an election rally in Gosaiganj, about 25 km from the temple town of Ayodhya, in which he focused much of his attention on terrorism. Gosaiganj is in the same district as Ayodhya but falls in the Ambedkarnagar Lok Sabha constituency. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra SinghRecalling the Easter Day blasts across Sri Lanka, he said, “We saw what happened in Sri Lanka. The same situation prevailed in our country before 2014. Can we forget the blast in Ayodhya? There were terrorist attacks on a daily basis.” In the past five years, he asserted, this has stopped. “It doesn’t mean terrorism has stopped. Terrorism factories are running in our neighbourhood. It is an industry there and it is their business. They are waiting for a weak government. They are waiting for a chance,” the prime minister warned. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroadCautioning people against terrorism, the prime minister referred to the oft seen signboards on roads, ‘Savdhani hati, Durghatna ghati (If we lower our guard, there will be a tragedy), and declared, “The game of terrorism is also the same.” “This is a new India. It doesn’t disturb anyone but also does not spare if someone disturbs us. Be it inside our borders or outside, this new India will hit terrorists in their den and reply to bullets with bullets,” he said in his speech in Hindi, using the words ‘ghar me ghus ke maarenge’ to make his point. If the country is safe, our aspirations will be fulfilled, Modi said at the Gosaiganj rally to mobilise support for BJP candidates Mukut Bihari Verma (Ambedkar Nagar) and Lallu Singh (Ayodhya). “To keep our culture and country safe, you all should press the lotus button,” he told the crowd. He also hit out at the Samajwadi Party-Bahujan Samaj Party alliance and the Congress, accusing the parties of being soft on terrorism. “Their record shows that agencies used to catch terrorists only to be let off for the sake of votes. They want to make a ‘mazboor’ (weak) government. You have to remain alert,” he said. He told the crowd that their love is his capital and energy and said this is the land of Ram, the land of the country’s pride. In a scathing attack against the SP and the BSP, he said they had done nothing for the poor and misused the names of Babasaheb Ambedkar and Ram Manohar Lohia. The prime minister said his is the only government that thinks of the poor.last_img read more

Two Young Girls Abducted via Facebook Found Captive in Casablanca

first_imgCasablanca- Two teenage girls who went missing in Marrakech were recently found captivein a house in Casablanca, according to daily Assabah.After four days of investigation, Hay Hassani police in Casablanca finally found the two girls, who had been abducted in Marrakech, held captive in a house in Casablanca.According to daily Assabah’s Wednesday issue, it was thanks to the father of one of the victims that both girls were eventually found. The father had checked his daughter’s Facebook page and posts to discover that his daughter had been communicating online with individuals from Casablanca.  The father found that the suspects had persuaded his daughter to leave her home in Marrakech and join them in Casablanca, according to the same source. The girl’s father subsequently lodged a complaint against the suspects, and the police then opened an investigation.  Less than 24 hours later, the police had arrested one of the people the girls had been chatting with on Facebook. The suspect subsequently led the police to where the girls were being held captive.  The investigation is far from being over, however.  The police suspect the existence of a larger criminal network, specializing in child abduction.© Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributedlast_img read more