Month: May 2021

Instincts guide leadership development

Groomingand advising leaders fit for the global stage is a messy business, says DavidButcher. In the first of our occasional Masterclasses, he offers guidance onhow to do it better Interestin leadership thrives on both sides of the Atlantic. Both UK and US articles onleadership continue to be published at a prodigious rate. Butat least one thing is changing. As though to offer a disclaimer for what theyare about to say, authors these days often begin by pointing out that there isstill no agreed definition of leadership. A quick browse through a selection ofboth practitioner and academic publications reveals this to be broadly correct,if a trifle pedantic. Yetthis state of affairs seems to have little impact on leader development andtraining, if mainstream practice is anything to go by. In this arena, what wemean by leadership is clear enough. But is it right, particularly if we arethinking about business leadership?Mostof the effort to develop business leaders takes the setting and communicating ofvision, goals and culture as the starting point. Strong emphasis is placed onunderstanding and deploying appropriate style, and all this is underpinned bythe need to identify and nurture essential personal qualities of leadershiplike integrity, and empathy. Someleaders are very obviously poor communicators, but they nonetheless runsuccessful businesses. Great organisations are sometimes headed by intolerant,narcissistic CEOs who by no stretch of the imagination can be said to varytheir style one iota. They have just the one, otherwise known as theirpersonality. They are often poor coaches, distant figures, who are anything butempathic. Andis it really the case in vibrant enterprises that everyone understands theoverall mission and corporate goals, never mind agrees with them? After all,organisational growth can be hugely exciting, but aimless. So it cannot be thatsimple.Principlesof rationalityOfcourse, business leadership is all about vision and goals if organisationsabide by principles of rationality and corporate unity, and most of us respondbetter to leaders who seem to understand and care about us. Thisfusion of rational and humanistic values, whilst both sensible and comfortable,hardly defines good leadership. There are too many other criteria. Butit is a seductive mix that has both spawned and legitimised a leadershipdevelopment sub-industry founded on these values. Its aim is to help createbusiness leaders capable of uniting and integrating an organisation aroundclear goals, courageously removing obstacles and taking everyone with them asthey go. Allof this must be done through listening deeply to the views of many, andrespecting all. It is a tough job, which is so much development support isneeded.Leadershipdevelopment methods follow naturally from these aims. Psychometric frameworksprovide the bench- mark personal characteristics of effective leaders.Strengths can be built on, whilst “less strong” areas become the focus fordevelopment, or alternatively, may be compensated for. Styleinventories offer templates for deciding how to behave and relate to others indifferent situations. And a burgeoning array of simulated and action learningprocesses – structured and unstructured, behavioural and cognitive, interactiveand solitary, abstract and specific – are used to develop leadership practice,supported by extensive coaching and mentoring processes.Thereis nothing wrong with these elaborate methodologies per se, and the more theycan be combined to develop the person in a holistic sense, the more valuablethey become. If there is one certainty about leadership it is its irreduciblenature. Butthey overemphasise the significance of style and the interpersonal dimension ofleadership. There is also a tendency to fudge the thorny old question ofwhether core leadership qualities can be developed. The assumption is that theycan, although no one is prepared to put money on it.Justas importantly, the model of management and organisation that lies behind thesedevelopment methods is not often born out in practice. And as with allfallacies that arise in the world of education and development, there is greatresistance to acknowledging this.CommunicatinggoalsThereis no point in developing leaders to set and communicate visionary, unifyinggoals if, nowadays, these are largely meaningless to people. With fewexceptions, most corporations, even the brand-based examples like Virgin orMcDonald’s, are umbrella organisations made up of a changing population ofstand-alone businesses. Forthat matter, in the new economy corporations can be expected to come and go atan unprecedented rate. Business leadership now is about creating the conditionsfor organisations to thrive as democratised internal markets, characterised byebb and flow in the fortunes of constituent business units. Thedevelopment process should reflect that, emphasising the need to managestakeholders, to understand empowerment, and to preside judiciously over thepolitical system that in truth is the essence of all organisations. Thetask of leading a business unit mirrors this. It involves treating thecorporate environment as a marketplace, using power well, and being aneffective politician. Only in small businesses that still own themselves is therole of the leader confined to the simple luxury of pursuing entrepreneurialvision.Developmentneeds to stress both leadership content and process. Content is about what abusiness is trying to achieve, what it represents, its rationale. It isfundamentally to do with useable ideas that come from a depth of understandingof the business. In this way, what a business is not about also becomes clear.This implies a strong emphasis on honing analytical skills and knowledge. Incontrast, leadership process is associated with the use of power and pursuingcontent in the context of political opposition. Forthe leader of a business unit this means setting the agenda and realising it inthe face of potential opposition from corporate executives as well as rivals inboth the internal and external markets. In other words, business leadershiprequires rather more than ambition and integrity, essential as these may be. Stylewill not create content, and the interpersonal conventions of good leadershipare of little help in the thick of political negotiation. Few leadershipdevelopment programmes, for example, address the problem of how to use power ina principled way, what it takes to lobby effectively, or how one mightdistinguish between constructive and destructive political processes. And ifthe development agenda needs to change, so do the assumptions about what can bedeveloped and over what period of time. Inthe case of senior and top management, knowledge, cognitive skills andattitudes towards power are hardly malleable, but they are at least susceptibleto change. With the right process, development can be rapid, although it is notusually. It always extends beyond a training intervention. Heartof leadershipSignificanttransitions in style, interaction patterns and qualities like ambition takemuch longer still, if they ever occur. This is a fundamental point that goes tothe heart of what makes someone a leader. Inthat respect it is more realistic to help people be who they already are, wartsand all, rather than become people they are not, and probably do not want tobe.Astrainers and developers, what does this tell us about business leaderdevelopment? Firstly, that we would do well to remind ourselves of how theprocess of becoming a leader is lifelong one. It embraces most, if not all,aspects of the self. Secondly,carefully crafted development methods are not necessarily relevant ones, nomatter how assiduously applied. After all, if a thing is not worth doing, it isnot worth doing well. Leaderdevelopment processes now need to stress business knowledge, organisationalanalysis and the use of power and politics at the expense of style and theinterpersonal dimension. Finally,and perhaps most important of all, we must be clear that what counted asbusiness leadership for most of the 20th century is less appropriate asorganisations are transformed by revolutionary shifts in the businessenvironment. No wonder there is still as much disagreement as ever about thedefinition of leadership.DavidButcher is director of the Business Leaders’ Programme at Cranfield School ofManagement Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Instincts guide leadership developmentOn 1 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today read more

Degrees of commitment

first_imgGraduatetrainers share their tips on winning the hearts and minds of this year’s pickof the cropIt’s that time of year: the leaves are turning and employers are gearing upto capitalise on one of their most expensive resources – graduate trainees. Recruitment costs and salaries for graduates have escalated over the pastfew years as employers compete to attract the best. This autumn’s intake canexpect to earn salaries of about £19,000 with one in 10 starting on £25,000 ormore. According to the Association of Graduate Recruiters, 28 per cent of firmshave also handed out a golden hello to graduates of anything from £500 to£10,000. But even with all that money thrown at them, there is no guarantee that yourprize graduates will stick with you. The AGR’s research shows that after fouryears most firms can expect to have lost between 30 and 40 per cent of theirgraduates. The problem is that over the past few years a real tension has grown upbetween the need to keep graduates and the harsh reality that no job is forlife and old-fashioned corporate careers don’t exist any more. As a result, although employers are still looking to grow their futureleaders, graduates are looking for jobs that will make them employableelsewhere. In addition there is a further tension between the needs of the companyas a whole and the requirements of individual business units. Graduate trainersare caught in the middle of this dilemma. Jonathan Wainwright a management development consultant with HBSO, formerlythe Halifax and the Bank of Scotland, is all too conscious of the need to keephold of high-fliers. HBSO’s graduate intake is still on the increase – it was 60 last year, 100this year and Wainwright expects it to go up to 140 or so next year. The bank has been refining its graduate training scheme over the past fewyears. One of the biggest changes has been in achieving a balance betweencentralised and decentralised development. Wainwright thinks HBSO has now gotit right. “Two or three years ago we were recruiting general business managementtrainees who spent time working in different areas before deciding where theywanted to be. Now we recruit graduates into specific business management areasuch as retail, finance, personnel and so on,” Wainwright says. As a result, each graduate has a two-tier programme. There is theprofessional training they receive in their business unit, for example trainingto become an actuary or retail sales manager. Then there is the coredevelopment programme that Wainwright runs centrally for all 100 graduates. “We have no control over what the business units do with theirgraduates, so what we are doing with our core programme is saying these peopleare high potential and we need to know who they are and where they are,”Wainwright says. The core programme lasts for about 18 months and consists of four modulesdesigned to deliver general leadership competencies. It’s also very much abouthelping future managers build up networks and learning communities within thebank that will last well beyond the 18 months. “When they come off the scheme, we will help them find a corporatementor from another part of the business to help them continue theirdevelopment, but they take control of it,” Wainwright says. By the time their first 18 months is up, HBSO presumes that most graduateswill be in a fairly substantive job within the organisation – but they areexpected to have contributed something of value to the organisation well beforethat. “We expect them to add value from day one. We can’t wait 18 months forgraduates to deliver benefit to the business,” Wainwright says. Other graduate recruiters echo his sentiments. There is much talk abouttoday’s graduates being more business aware than their counterparts a decadeago. Whether or not this is really so, employers expect a return on theirmassive investment and they want their graduates to hit the ground running. The best graduate training schemes are therefore now designed to instilbusiness savvy into graduates as quickly as possible. In the case of highstreet optician Dolland & Aitchison and car manufacturer Ford, this isabout providing graduates with an insight into customer needs. “Part of our European strategy is about being in touch with ourcustomers and that’s something we have been building into our trainingprogramme for graduates,” says Joanna Banfield, recruitment manager withFord of Britain. The induction programme is one tool to get this message across. Ford alsosends out a motivational message from chairman Jacques Nasser each week.”This always includes a reference to the need to be consumer driven,”Banfield says. A growing number of graduate employers have decided that the only way toensure graduates are work ready is by working more closely with them throughuniversity. This approach is in line with the government’s insistence thatstudents should be more employable when they finish their degrees and it goesfar beyond the sort of work placements that were being offered to students onsandwich courses 10 years ago. For example, supermarket chain Asda runs its Flying Start programme, whichgives students training as well as a part-time job. The aim is to encouragethese students, who now have a fair understanding of what Asda is about, to jointhe company as graduate trainees. Other employers such as Ford and PriceWaterhouseCoopers send staff on tocampuses to provide training in soft skills such as presentation andcommunication techniques. “This approach seems to be working – graduatesdo have more business awareness now,” says Jackie Alexander, recruitmentpartner with PwC. “It’s partly because they are working more during their universitydays, but it’s also because there is more input at university fromemployers.” Over the past couple of years, Ford has been providing this sort ofon-campus training through a consortium of four university careers services inthe Northeast, called Impact. In addition, the car giant is about to launch a mentoring scheme targetingethnic minority undergraduates in their penultimate year. “We want to helpundergraduates identify their weaknesses and build their strengths in theirfinal year. We want them to feel prepared for work,” Banfield says. There will be 25 places available and mentors will be keen line managersdrawn from each of Ford’s seven business functions. Mentoring sessions will take place in a variety of ways – on site, oncampus, over the phone or via e-mail. In addition, Ford will offer undergraduates on the mentoring scheme fivedays in-house training covering skills such as team working and interviewingskills. Finally, each will be fast-tracked to the Ford graduate assessment centre,with a view to being offered a job when they graduate. It’s too early to say how the current downturn is going to affect thenumbers of graduates that firms take on. There have been a few high profileannouncements of employers such as the consultancy arm of PwC, deferring orcancelling some job offers. But even if the number of graduate vacancies falls, firms are unlikely tocut back on the levels of training they are offering students before and afterthey graduate. Graduates will still be an expensive resource and firms will still becompeting for the best. What is more, the increased mobility of the labour market has meant thattraining is now a core part of the package employers offer. They can’t affordto take their eyes off the ball. Case study: Life at latticeIf you want your expensive graduates to stick with you, then you have to givea good impression from day one. With this in mind, the Lattice Group, formed last year out ofBritish Gas, runs an energetic induction programme for its new graduates. “The programme provides an insight into the culture,strategy and structures of the business,” says Jim Borritt, graduaterecruitment and development manager with Transco, a member of the Latticegroup.  The programme is now in its fourth year and more than 50graduates attended the most recent two-week course run earlier this month. Itis built on a range of experiential exercises and draws on the input of manysenior managers.Lattice has adopted the view that getting stuck in is probablythe best way to get on, and by day four graduates are making fantasy millions.Working in teams of seven or eight , they have to earn points to purchaseT-shirt designs. They “win” money according to how well they haveperformed and their winnings go with them into week two of the course.The aim of week two is to create a realistic work environment.Working in the same teams graduates are presented with a project to researchthroughout the week. These focus on key business issues for the group such asthe branding of the Lattice Group.The induction provides a dynamic introduction to the group andmarks the start of graduates’ two-year training programme. Thereafter theirtraining takes place at company level.Case study: Vision offutureHigh street optician Dollond & Aitchison is taking onaround 40 graduate optometrists this year. In addition to excellent clinical skills, D&A wants itsgraduate trainees to be able to build a rapport with patients. So it has justrun a five-day programme aimed at marrying clinical expertise and customer care.”Optometrists must be professional, friendly and caring.They have to able to explain all stages of the eye examination and to reassurethe patient by providing unbiased, professional advice,” says director ofprofessional services with D&A Rob Hogan.The firm argues that if patients come out of an eye examinationfeeling good about the care, attention and information they have just received,they are more likely to purchase glasses in the store and become a customer.Designed by training firm Interaction, the programme is gearedto developing graduates’ ability to listen to and empathise with theirpatients. Graduates kicked off with a mystery shopper exercise. Some were given a range of products from different stores toreturn. Others were also asked to buy the same products at different stores andthe rest took eye tests or asked for advice at competitor branches. Back at base, role play helped graduates further develop theirchair-side manner. Actors stood in as patients with graduates conducting eyeexaminations. Graduates were expected to cope and keep the examination going as”patients” became increasingly demanding.Hogan says feedback has been encouraging. “The programmehas provided a solid foundation for graduates from which to learn and aspire toexcellence in customer service,” he says. Comments are closed. Degrees of commitmentOn 1 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Employment law surrenders to basic instinct

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Employment lawyers have a great deal to thank Hollywood actor MichaelDouglas for, according to a leading employment law advocate. Disclosure highlighted sexual harassment in the workplace, Wall Streetshowed the damage done when a key employee leaves and engages in competitiveactivity. Now with Douglas v Hello!, his dispute with the magazine about hiswedding photographs, gives employment lawyers a masterclass on the law ofconfidence and privacy, said Paul Goulding QC of Blackstone Chambers addressingthe Employment Lawyers’ Association in London on December 4. OK! magazine had undertaken to pay Michael Douglas and his bride, CatherineZeta Jones, a large sum for exclusive rights to publish wedding photographs. OK! asserted that rival publication Hello! offered three times thecontractual sum but that the couple trusted OK! to publish only the images theywanted published. On 20 November 2000, two days after the wedding, Zeta Joneswarned OK! that Hello! was about to publish unauthorised photographs. Aninterim injunction was obtained but Hello! appealed and the Court of Appealdischarged the injunction. Hello! published its spoiling issue three daysbefore OK!’s. Goulding QC commented: “The decision is of considerable significance toemployment lawyers. Douglas v Hello! demonstrates the common law’s capacity todevelop established doctrines and apply them to unprecedented situations. Italso illustrates the growing importance of the law of privacy, often a closerelation of the law of confidence. “Adapting well-established principles to a changing technologicalenvironment, coupled with the impact of the Human Rights Act, bothsubstantively and procedurally, means that this field is particularly ripe forfurther development under the influence of creative and ingenious argumentsfrom employment lawyers.” Related posts:No related photos. Employment law surrenders to basic instinctOn 1 Dec 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

Older workers dissatisfied with managers’ performance

first_img Previous Article Next Article Research shows the older the employee, the less well managed they think theyareOnly two out of five employees feel they are getting sufficient help tomanage their stress levels at work, and older workers are most critical ofmanagers’ skills. Research commissioned by the Industrial Society Learning and Development,part of outsourcing specialist Capita, asked 850 full-time and part-timeworkers what they thought about their immediate bosses’ management abilities. While 59 per cent rated their general line management skills positively,three out of five felt they were getting insufficient help with workplacestress. One in four (26 per cent) of full-time workers and almost one in five (19per cent) of part timers described their manager’s stress management skills as‘poor’ or ‘very poor’. According to the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, stress isthe most common cause of long-term absence, with stress-related sick dayscosting British industry an estimated £7.1m a week. Younger people, said the study, generally had a more positive outlook thanthose in their later working years. And the older the employee, the lessgenerally well managed they thought they were. Christine Garner, managing director of Industrial Society Learning and Developmentsaid: “Businesses should be sensitive to the needs of their olderemployees, who seem to face increasing dissatisfaction with their bosses’general management skills as they get older.” www.islearning.co.uk Comments are closed. Older workers dissatisfied with managers’ performanceOn 1 Aug 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Equal pay reviews won’t just go away

first_imgEqual pay reviews won’t just go awayOn 11 Mar 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. We’ve said it’s a hot topic before, and this week’s front-page coverage ofan equal pay claim just confirms it. If the claim by Unison on behalf ofteaching assistants is successful, it will lead to a flood of similar disputes,potentially costing county councils millions. Whatever your business, a pay review should be on your priority list ofthings to do this year. The Government’s taskforce insists pay audits must beconducted and acted upon to meet new requirements on company reporting. Allcentral government departments are supposed to be leading by example and arecommitted to equal pay reviews by this Spring. France, Canada, Sweden and evenparts of the US have already made pay audits mandatory and there’s the threatof that here if employers fail to put adequate systems in place. Personnel Today has broken ranks with employer groups like the CBI to backthe mandatory route. We have been frustrated by examples of institutionalsexism and evidence that past warnings about serious claims have been ignored. The workplace is still riddled with inequality and HR is in a uniqueposition to do something about it. Women working full-time still earn 19 percent less an hour than men, while women working nights, often to fit in aroundchildcare, do not receive the same perks as men. Even in HR itself, we have the situation of female HR chiefs’ pay laggingbehind their male counterparts by 25 per cent. It’s a miracle that young womenare still flocking to HR with that disparity looming over them. Find out if your organisation has a pay problem by kick-starting a reviewnow. Consult with the unions and staff representatives and regularly review toensure continuing fairness. The Equal Opportunities Commission has aseven-point action plan to implement pay reviews, so seek its help today. New ways for the public sector Mary Mallett follows a long line of impressive local government HR directorsthis week by taking over the presidency of Socpo (the Society of ChiefPersonnel Officers). Her enthusiasm for the job and for the challenges facing HR in the public sectoris palpable and timely. The public sector may have initiative overload, but there are no signs ofweariness or a desire to water down the reforms so badly needed to improveservices. As the special supplement with this issue shows, there is tons of dynamismin public sector HR and a willingness to think radically. Pushing theboundaries on old organisational ways requires resilience and determination.The profession should be proud of the shifts it is making already. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

HR must help sharpen up UK business image

first_img Previous Article Next Article Business has an appalling reputation with the British public and HRdirectors can play a major role in changing perceptions and enthusing theworkforce on wealth creation. This was the combined message from Michael Portillo MP and Digby Jones,director general of the CBI, who shared a platform as speakers at the firstPersonnel Today HR Directors Club breakfast briefing last week. Held at The Crypt, St Paul’s Cathedral, the event was supported by 75 HRdirectors from the country’s largest employer organisations who had cometogether for business inspiration and networking. Michael Portillo said there was not enough idealism in business, with fewpeople seeing the creation of wealth as a noble task. “The efficiency ofour enterprise will be hampered if we don’t have respect for theproletariat.” Digby Jones agreed employers must take the lead in improving the image ofbusiness. He also warned that in addition to public concerns about fat cat payand corporate governance, there could also be future problems with the economyover public spending and over-regulation. The Personnel Today HR Directors Club is organised specifically for seniorHR executives in organisations with 1,000-plus employees. It includes breakfastbrief-ings with guest speakers and a website – HRdirectorsclub.com – wheremembers can communicate with each other and keep up-to-date with Clubactivities. The Club is supported by six sponsors offering services to the HRprofession: Arinso, DDI, DBM, PWC, PeopleSoft and Xchanging. Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. HR must help sharpen up UK business imageOn 10 Jun 2003 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

Trust welcomes chance to address stress issues

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Trust welcomes chance to address stress issuesOn 19 Aug 2003 in Personnel Today The head of HR at an NHS trust, ordered to improve the way it deals withstress by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), has welcomed the intervention.Robert Pascall, HR director at West Dorset Hospitals NHS Trust, believes theHSE will help it to continue to improve its working environment for allemployees. It is the first time the HSE has started enforcement proceedings against alarge employer over the issue of stress, and follows a complaint by a formermember of staff over alleged bullying and a long-hours culture. The HSE issued an improvement notice under the Health and Safety at WorkAct, giving the trust until 15 December to put in place measures to identify –and where necessary address – employee stress, or face potentially unlimitedfines. The trust is to use the HSE’s draft stress management standards to addressconcerns raised by the complaint. It will carry out a risk assessment, including establishing a staff surveyto identify how staff feel about their jobs and working environment. Pascall said: “We need to establish the extent to which employeesperceive there is a problem and, if there is, the factors that cause it and anypatterns of concern. If there are concerns about these issues [bullying or longhours], we will deal with them. He added: “It is only by going through this process that we will beable to identify and address any problems. If [for example] there is a need forbetter training for managers, we will look at that.” last_img read more

Dr Kelly case highlights the fact that stress kills

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Dr Kelly case highlights the fact that stress killsOn 21 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today Lifeis stressful. And stress is pretty relative. Just ask MP Michael Portillo;currently recovering from seven days as a single mum, looking after fourchildren on just over £70 a week in Liverpool.Withoutpressure to act, imposed by our character or circumstance, we wouldn’t. Wewould just sit. And sit. Perhaps we would occasionally shift to a morecomfortable position, but only due to atmospheric pressure causing pain in ourbacks, or backsides. Andyet, stress can debilitate. Too much stress, and the body and mind tend tobecome strained, deformed, or shrunk. It becomes, as Portillo said of hisexperience, “just horrible”. Anexcess of stress is bad news. Our ability to make decisions is impaired. We mayavoid difficult situations or leap aggressively into foolish fights. More thanhalf a million Britons are seriously damaged by stress each year. Its symptomscan leave us overwhelmed, irritable, depressed, or simply ineffective, and thatkind of stress is expensive. This week, Personnel Today estimates it costs UKorganisations around £1.24bn a year in lost productivity, while the HSE putsthe figure closer to £3.7bn.Stressis not new. The Roman colosseum provides vivid examples. Lions, tigers andbears were trained against their natures to kill people. This was accomplishedby feeding them human flesh, treating them mean to keep them aggressive, andstarving them. Even then, many animals faced by 50,000 screaming people simplyran away and cowered in corners. The stress of being mistreated and thenterrified was too much for their brains, which simply shut down.Thiswas pretty savage stuff, and it was also illogical. It reduced what the animalscould contribute rather than enhancing their natural attributes. Itmisunderstood the impact of over-stressing. Theonly good news was that the beast’s master usually paid the ultimate penaltyfor his failure. In our modern world, senior managers are rarely the first topay for savage, over-competitive, under-supportive cultures. The price is paidfirst by the people who are expected to perform when their egos are deflated,by rules that prevent them doing a good job, and by feedback that is eitherill-judged or absent. Theword ‘stress’ comes from the Old French word ‘estrece’. It means narrowness oroppression, and it is only when the options are too narrow, or the workoppressive, that stress becomes a problem. When we have no hope; when we havebeen abandoned by the organisation that should have been our protector; when wecannot see any positive outcome; and when there is no future worth working for.DrDavid Kelly’s death should remind us that, sometimes, stress can be a matter oflife and death.ByMax Mckeown, Consultant and author of Unshrink the Peoplelast_img read more

What is an expert?

first_img Previous Article Next Article What is an expert?Shared from missc on 9 Dec 2014 in Personnel Today Read full article During our working lives, almost by default, we look at the long tenured staff members in our organisations with reverence. We see them as professionals to look up to, fountains of knowledge and information, given the years of service. Quite rightly so. In that time, they must have learned a fair amount about the industry in which they operate. But surely having 10, 15, 20 years of experience in an industry doesn’t constitute immediate ‘expert status’?In my opinion, it’s the breadth of experience you have in your chosen skill-set that will differentiate you. Let’s take the recruitment industry for example. Recruitment isn’t the type of industry that has one clear cut way to do things that’s considered “correct” and does not follow a specific formula or set of rules. Success in recruitment will come from tackling a range of recruitment challenges in your career and the way in which you handle them, along with the experience you gain from them. The length of time in an industry can of course ensure a certain depth of knowledge in one or a number of things and in my opinion, I would put a higher value in less depth of knowledge of 10 recruitment challenges learned over 20 years, than 20 years of experience facing one recruitment challenge.It’s the age old “1 year of experience 10 ways, or 10 years of experience 1 way” adage. I believe the most successful recruiters who can legitimately call themselves experts fall into the “1 year of experience 10 ways” group. We operate in an industry where our skill-set is not an exact science. It will be our adaptability and ability to be agile in our approach when grasping the intricacies of any given talent acquisition problem, (whether it’s internal or agency, large enterprise or SME, volume or not etc.) and offering expertise on efficient and effective ways to manage it based on previous experience, that will genuinely ensure the worthiness of the reverence you will receive.center_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

What is an expert?

first_imgRead full article Related posts:No related photos. What is an expert?Shared from missc on 9 Dec 2014 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlecenter_img During our working lives, almost by default, we look at the long tenured staff members in our organisations with reverence. We see them as professionals to look up to, fountains of knowledge and information, given the years of service. Quite rightly so. In that time, they must have learned a fair amount about the industry in which they operate. But surely having 10, 15, 20 years of experience in an industry doesn’t constitute immediate ‘expert status’?In my opinion, it’s the breadth of experience you have in your chosen skill-set that will differentiate you. Let’s take the recruitment industry for example. Recruitment isn’t the type of industry that has one clear cut way to do things that’s considered “correct” and does not follow a specific formula or set of rules. Success in recruitment will come from tackling a range of recruitment challenges in your career and the way in which you handle them, along with the experience you gain from them. The length of time in an industry can of course ensure a certain depth of knowledge in one or a number of things and in my opinion, I would put a higher value in less depth of knowledge of 10 recruitment challenges learned over 20 years, than 20 years of experience facing one recruitment challenge.It’s the age old “1 year of experience 10 ways, or 10 years of experience 1 way” adage. I believe the most successful recruiters who can legitimately call themselves experts fall into the “1 year of experience 10 ways” group. We operate in an industry where our skill-set is not an exact science. It will be our adaptability and ability to be agile in our approach when grasping the intricacies of any given talent acquisition problem, (whether it’s internal or agency, large enterprise or SME, volume or not etc.) and offering expertise on efficient and effective ways to manage it based on previous experience, that will genuinely ensure the worthiness of the reverence you will receive. Comments are closed.last_img read more