Prayer from the inside and the outside

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release [Episcopal News Service] As Christians we practice prayer, we talk about prayer, and (if we’re ordained) we preach about prayer. But this past fall I got the chance to learn about prayer from a different perspective while writing a magazine article about the physical and psychological effects of this age-old spiritual practice.While doing research for the article, I interviewed several of the nation’s top researchers in the field of spirituality and health. They told me that more than 4000 studies have been done on the ways our religious beliefs and practices affect our physical and mental well-being. They talked about prayer as it relates to the mind-body connection, described what brain scans show when people are meditating, outlined the challenges of conducting double-blind studies of intercessory prayer, and speculated about the physical mechanisms that may be at work in prayer.I came away with considerable respect for the dedication of these researchers. But I was also struck by something one of these scientists said, a man who has spent his professional life researching the physical effects of prayer. “I study prayer, but I also practice prayer,” he added at the end of our interview, unprompted by any question from me. “I think the science is important, but I’m not going to base my religious practice on whether the latest double-blind trial finds something. The ability to connect with God, to connect with the eternal and holy, is a precious resource that we all have. That’s why I pray, not because science proves that it’s good for me.”I found it reassuring that even a top-notch research scientist recognizes the limits of his work. But his comment got me thinking about other experts on prayer: those who have actually experienced its power.I think, for example, of my friend Teri, who recently spoke at our church as part of an adult forum series on prayer. She talked of how she had been somewhat of a skeptic about prayer, despite having grown up in a devout family and having been an on-and-off member of a church herself for years. But when she was diagnosed with cancer last year, her extended family organized a healing service for her in the Roman Catholic parish in which she’d grown up. In came her aunts, uncles, cousins, second cousins twice removed, old teachers, school buddies, old neighbors, friends of her brothers and sister and their in-laws, and a bunch of people she’d never met before who came because they were part of a faith community and knew that someone was suffering and needed their help.Young woman praying before the healing shrine in Lourdes, France. PHOTO/Lori EricksonIn the middle of the service, the members of the congregation came forward and placed their hands on Teri’s head, shoulders, arms and back as they prayed, and she said she felt a kind of vibration or current flowing through her.Teri used a metaphor to describe what that experience was like, one that I’ve never heard used in conjunction with prayer. She said that she felt like she was a kite being lifted up into the sky by a string of prayers and that their collective energy was guiding her in flight.“That feeling still resonates with me even now, eight months later,” she said. “I haven’t been the same since.  It’s not that I don’t get scared or grumpy or weepy at times, but I have a feeling or a knowing that the Holy Spirit is present. Some kind of energetic shift has occurred that has knocked me out of my head and into my heart.”And then she quoted a line from Rumi, the fourteenth-century Sufi poet who knew better than almost anyone the power of the Spirit:All of my life I’ve been knocking at the door, and when it finally opened, I realized that I was knocking from the inside.When we look for experts on prayer, we shouldn’t discount the contributions of scientists. But truly, the great masters of prayer are those who have felt its power from the inside.— Lori Erickson writes about inner and outer journeys at www.spiritualtravels.info.  She serves as a deacon at Trinity Episcopal Church in Iowa City, Iowa. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By Lori EricksonPosted Jan 30, 2012 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Prayer from the inside and the outside Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

Anglican Church of Burundi to plant 10 million trees in…

first_img Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Church of Burundi to plant 10 million trees in five years Anglican Communion, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Environment & Climate Change Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Gavin Drake Posted Dec 19, 2016 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Eventscenter_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Anglican Communion News Service] The planting of trees to mark special occasions like confirmations, baptisms and weddings is an increasingly popular practice in many areas of southern and central Africa, after it was suggested and promoted by young Green Anglicans. But the Province of Burundi is going a step further and is looking to plant one tree for every one of the 10 million-strong population of the country. The church hopes to reach its “One Person, One Tree” goal within the next five years.Full article. Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Africa, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

New Orleans church, home to ‘murder board,’ eyes new tribute…

first_imgNew Orleans church, home to ‘murder board,’ eyes new tribute to victims in stars on ceiling Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA St. Anna’s Episcopal Church in the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana, has posted the names of the city’s homicide victims since 2007 on a wall outside the church. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Though far from a good year, 2019 was a statistically better year for New Orleans, Louisiana: The city recorded 119 homicides, the fewest in nearly 50 years, further distancing itself from its reputation just a decade ago as the unofficial “murder capital” of the United States.But the recent decrease in deaths has not alleviated the human toll that violence, particularly gun violence, takes each year on the people of New Orleans. They still are murdered at a higher rate than residents of all but three other major U.S. cities. Their deaths still leave holes in the lives of surviving loved ones and the community.And their names continue to be added to the “murder board” at St. Anna’s Episcopal Church. Since 2007, the congregation has maintained and updated this memorial list outside the church in the city’s Tremé neighborhood just north of the French Quarter. The memorial now contains more than a thousand names of people killed in and near the city, and even with homicides decreasing, more than 100 new names are posted each year.“That’s still an intolerable amount,” the Rev. Bill Terry, rector of St. Anna’s, told Episcopal News Service by phone. “We have a large part of our community that lives in a deep longing and a deep and profound sadness,” he said, and the church’s lament for that loss of life transcends any public policy success extolled by government leaders.The permanent memorial at St. Anna’s, covering a fence next to the church, lists each victim’s name, age, date of death and method – “shot” is the most common – but it only covers 2007 to 2012 because the congregation ran out of room on the fence. So, the current year’s homicide victims are written in marker on a separate board attached to a nearby church wall. The congregation envisions a new memorial large enough to commemorate all the victims, by representing them as a sky full of stars on the ceiling inside the church.Joel Dyer calls it “Stargazers.” He is the local artist who came up with the idea for the new memorial and now is trying to raise money to install it at St. Anna’s, where he has been a parishioner for most of the past decade. The ceiling of the nave and sanctuary would be painted blue, and 2 1/2-inch gold stars would be arranged in a grid, with enough estimated room to memorialize up to 5,000 murder victims.“I thought ‘Stargazers’ would imply a little hope,” Dyer, 74, said in an interview with ENS, adding, “our hope is to keep our kids off that ceiling.”Artist Joel Dyer, a parishioner at St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, sketched the design on the left for a future Stargazers’ tribute to murder victims, which would be displayed on the ceiling of the church, shown in the photo on the right provided by Luigi Mandile.One star will shine particularly bright in the eyes of this diverse congregation on Esplanade Avenue. Robert Atkins, 21 years old when he was shot and killed on Oct. 20, 2016, grew up attending the church and had served as an acolyte since he was 5 – a “perfect little boy,” his mother, Althea Atkins-McCall, remembered in a phone interview.Robert Atkins, 21, was shot and killed in October 2016, less than two weeks after this photo was taken while he was attending his mother’s wedding at St. Anna’s. Photo courtesy of Althea Atkins-McCallThe connection between her family and St. Anna’s goes beyond a name on a memorial. “It’s a little deeper for me because we actually were very much involved in the church,” Atkins-McCall said, and though she now lives in Louisiana’s capital city of Baton Rouge, she still has “just a great appreciation for the level of commitment that Father Terry has for the community and the members of his church.”Atkins’ murder remains unsolved, and his mother is grateful for ways “of keeping my son’s name alive.” Though his killing was too recent to be included on the permanent list at St. Anna’s, Atkins-McCall donated a bench in his name that was installed next to the sidewalk in front of the church memorial, so anyone who visits can sit in contemplation and remembrance.Terry had only been rector at St. Anna’s a couple years when Hurricane Katrina dealt a devastating blow to New Orleans in 2005. Once a city of nearly 500,000 people, New Orleans lost more than half its population in Katrina’s aftermath as it struggled with recovery efforts, but the number of homicides remained high. When murders reached 209 in 2007, the city’s estimated per capita murder rate topped that of any other major American city.Early in 2007, thousands of people marched in New Orleans to protest the killings and what they saw as public officials’ inadequate response. After the march, Terry began talking to a deacon about what St. Anna’s could do. They came up with the idea of publicly naming each of the victims, and “we’ve really been doing that ever since,” Terry said.In addition to writing the names on a display outside the church, St. Anna’s began incorporating a reading of the latest victims’ names into Sunday services, which typically draw about 120 worshippers. Church staff members scour local media outlets each week for reports of killings and follow up with authorities to obtain information about the victims.Other churches asked to receive the names compiled by St. Anna’s, and now the lists are sent out every week by email, usually on Thursdays. They include people killed outside the city limits, in communities that are part of greater New Orleans.The church is “literally on the border between two worlds,” Terry said, between some of the city’s wealthiest neighborhoods and those struggling with deep poverty. That intersection is reflected in the congregation, which Terry said includes parishioners from a mix of backgrounds, many of them middle-class or low-income residents.Crime is driven by a range of factors, and fluctuations in crime rates defy easy explanations. Terry, though, noted that extreme poverty, an affordable housing shortage and limited job opportunities continue to plague New Orleans, and the local black community, which had made up a significant majority of city residents, has been greatly diminished since Katrina.The “murder board” at St. Anna’s Episcopal Church is only big enough to fit the hundreds of names of homicide victims from 2007 to 2012. The church is looking for a long-term solution to memorialize all the victims since 2007. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe church regularly gets visitors to the homicide memorial. Terry recalls a police sergeant who spent about 15 minutes one day looking over the names before approaching the rector in tears: “I saw four of my high school friends on your murder board,” he said.Mere numbers can dehumanize crime victims, Terry said, and “most of these people live in poverty. They have no memorials.” He thinks simply sharing their names is a step toward giving them some dignity in death, though the congregation doesn’t stop there. St. Anna’s also supports neighborhood children and their families through its Anna’s Place program, and it is raising money now for an ambitious expansion of those efforts called the Dodwell House.“The ‘murder board’ is a memorial. It’s a public spiritual statement to the world that life maters. But that’s not good enough,” Terry said. “We have to become disrupters in cycles of violence, so the Gospel begins to take shape in the community.”As the “murder board” grew to include more than a thousand names, the list stretched across the church’s fence, eventually running out of room. Terry said one option the congregation is considering is to reinstall the permanent memorial so it is configured to fit nearly 3,000 names, but that still would only hold the names of victims through 2017. The longer-term solution is the Stargazers project.The ceiling of the church is large enough to accommodate stars for all the victims since 2007. Plans also include a computer kiosk, so visitors can search victims’ names and find where on the ceiling each victim’s memorial star is displayed.And there will be room for the memorial to expand as more residents of the New Orleans area succumb to deadly violence.“It can be discouraging because it’s so common,” Atkins-McCall said.Her family was fortunate in many ways. She and her family immigrated to the United States from Guyana in 1989 and settled in New Orleans, where her mother made sure they attended church, first at Christ Church Cathedral and then at St. Anna’s.Robert Atkins, left, poses for a photo with the Rev. Bill Terry at St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, where Terry presided at the wedding of Atkins’ mother. Atkins had been active in the congregation for most of his childhood. Photo courtesy of Althea Atkins-McCall“We had this very strong Christian-based upbringing,” she said, and she instilled the same in her son, who was born in 1995.Robert Atkins was “everything you wanted in a kid,” she said, but tragedy struck early in his life. His father, who had been Atkins-McCall’s high school sweetheart, was shot and killed a few months after their son’s first birthday.Despite that loss, Robert grew into a gifted student who loved art and football, his mother said, and St. Anna’s “became home and became part of our family.”Atkins was taking a break from college in 2016 and working an overnight security job when he was murdered. He would call his mother after getting home from his shift, and when he didn’t call that morning, she grew worried. Later that day, she learned from his girlfriend that he had been shot in a car, pushed into the street and left for dead.The killing was all the more jarring because it came at a time of celebration: Less than two weeks earlier, Robert Atkins had been all smiles while attending his mother’s wedding at St. Anna’s. Terry, who presided at the wedding, later led a candlelight vigil with the family at the scene of Atkins’ murder.Atkins-McCall still holds out hope that police will find who killed her son, and she sometimes checks in with investigators, to see if they have any new information and to remind them that she still wants answers.When she gets discouraged, she looks back on her son’s last Instagram post, which she said seemed both to foreshadow his death and to show that his faith remained strong. The photo appeared to be of a page from a Christian devotional, leading with the sentence, “You are on the right path.”“I’m behind you Lord!” Atkins wrote in the post. “You gotta trust him and trust yourself. Your time is NEAR.”“He was an awesome kid,” Atkins-McCall said. “Whatever God placed him here to do, it was accomplished.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Gun Violence Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By David PaulsenPosted Feb 5, 2020 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

Mayor of Windermere to speak about Cuba at NORWF

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gary Bruhn, Mayor of Windermere, to speak about Cuba at NORWF November meeting.“People are boarding cruise ships and booking flights to visit Cuba and see its sights and what they want you to see,” says Gary Bruhn. “Two years ago I had the opportunity to see the way a Cuban lives. Life in Cuba is not like anything you may imagine.”Gary Bruhn, Mayor of the Town of WindermereGary Bruhn is the Mayor of the Town of Windermere and is serving his seventh term.Bruhn will speak about the authoritarian regime that effects Cuba. During his 2014 exploration into Cuba he learned of the mass devastation the Cubans deal with every day. From little to no pay, high taxes, and very poor infrastructure. Bruhn will display detailed pictures from his travels.Mayor Bruhn also serves as the Chairman of the Orange County Council of Mayors comprised of every Orange County Mayor. He is a member of the Florida League of Mayors Board of Directors, the West Orange Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, and U.S. Army Community Advisory Board. He is a member of and the past Chairperson of the Florida League of Cities Urban Administration Legislative Committee.He is the Past Chairman of the How Shall We Grow Congress of Regional Leaders who work to create a 50 year vision of future growth comprised of seven counties and representing 3.5 million people of Central Florida. He is the Past President of the Tri-County League of Cities as well as a past member of their Board of Directors and the Florida League of Cities Board of Directors.In 2014 Bruhn received the West Orange Chamber of Commerce’s Sam Hovsepian Award recognizing him for his contributions, service and leadership to the community.He is retired from Lockheed Martin where he worked for almost three decades as an Information Technology Manager coordinating application maintenance and development across many program areas including missiles, space, aeronautics and homeland security. He has been married for 34 years, has lived in Windermere for 28 years and has one son.The NORWF Lunch Meeting is November 17, 2016, from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm, at Apopka Golf & Tennis at Errol Estate, 1355 Errol Parkway, Apopka, FL 32712. Cost is $20.00 (includes lunch) with reservation and $25.00 without a reservation. Everyone is invited to attend. There is limited seating so please make your reservation now. Deadline is November 14.For more information and reservations, please contact Joyce Hayward at 407-463-7266 or email [email protected] Reservations can also be made on NORWF’s website at www.norwf.org. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 1 COMMENT Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Mama Mia TAGSCubaNORWF Previous articleRun with a CopNext articleNew Tijuana Flats welcomes first customers Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 center_img Reply Well at least some of the Cubans have some well made cars that aren’t overloaded with electrical garbage to go on the blink, and costs a fortune to repair. Good ole’ muscle cars. Looks like a 56 Chevy in the middle, maybe a 55 Chevy, not sure. My cousin had a 57 Chevy so I am certain it is not a 57, it had more of a wing design in the back on the sides. October 31, 2016 at 3:53 pm Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Orange County Sheriff’s efforts are awarded tomorrow

first_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Orange County Sheriff’s Office Awards CeremonyWHAT:           2017 OCSO Awards CeremonyWHEN:         Today at 2:00 PMWHERE:   Training Room 1 @ 2500 West Colonial Drive, Orlando, FL 32804WHO: Various members of the Orange County Sheriff’s Office along with members of our community who has gone above and beyond in Making A Difference.Sheriff Jerry Demings will present several individuals with their certificates and medals… among them are:Certificate of Appreciation to Alyssa Vasquez, 16 YOA (Citizen). On February 28, 2017, while shopping at a local store, Alyssa Vazquez witnessed a suspect enter the store and commit an armed robbery. She ran out to her father’s vehicle and told him about the robbery. Mr. Pena immediately called 911 and proceeded to follow the suspect who left on foot. As he followed at a safe distance, he provided updates on the location to responding deputies. Her actions aided in the capture of a violent felon without regard for her own safety.Medal of Merit to Master Deputy Jeffrey Riggs. On March 20, 2017, a motorist suffered an epileptic seizure and blacked out. While unconscious, the motorist’s vehicle swerved and crossed the grassy median directly in front of on-coming traffic. The vehicle then collided with a pole and traveled into a retention pond. The vehicle became submerged with the driver and his 2 children inside. M/D Riggs removed the driver from the vehicle with little concern for his own safety, he returned to the vehicle and assisted a number of citizens in rescuing the 2 children from the back seat. All the occupants of the vehicle were successfully evacuated and treated by rescue units. Medal of Merit to Sgt. Steve Fortier, State Corrections Officer James Miller.On March 9, 2017, a single vehicle ran off the roadway and struck a palm tree. Without hesitation, both Sergeant Fortier and Officer Miller jumped into action and assisted by pulling the driver out of the vehicle which immediately caught fire. Their performance under pressure, leadership at the scene, and overall commitment to assist reflect greatly on their character.Medal of Merit (Master Deputy Eric Lucas) and Medal of Valor and Combat Award (Deputy First Class Jonathon Brown) On February 16, 2014, deputies responded to a domestic call where the wife reported her husband was angry and getting his shotgun. The suspect was reported to suffer from depression and taking Xanax pills. While entering the residence in an effort to free the wife and children, they encountered the suspect with the shotgun pacing back and forth. When the suspect exited the back sliding glass door, they entered the house where they were able to get the victim and her children out of the residence. Once all family members were safely removed from the house, DFC Brown positioned himself at the rear of the residence. After an hour and 45 minutes, the suspect walked out of the rear sliding glass door with his shotgun in hand. When the suspect was challenged, he raised the shotgun at DFC Brown. DFC Brown fired one round, striking the suspect in the left side of his chest. If not for their brave actions, the victims may have been killed by the suspect. Their courage made a difference. September 8, 2017 at 4:26 pm wB7mOm http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7ojQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twittercenter_img JimmiNu 1 COMMENT Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment! TAGSOrange County Sheriff’s Office Awards Ceremony Previous articleBreaking News: Youth shot in ZellwoodNext articlePlug into the local business community at the Apopka Business Incubator Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more

District urges preparedness as Hurricane Irma approaches

first_img The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSHurricane IrmaSt. Johns River Water Management District Previous articleCity facilities closing at 2 PM todayNext articleOrange County remains at Level 2 Status Ahead of Hurricane Irma Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! From the St. John’s River Water Management DistrictAs Hurricane Irma approaches Florida this weekend, the St. Johns River Water Management District reminds property owners to be prepared for heavy rains by cleaning debris from storm drains and reporting clogged ditches to local governments in advance of the storm. The public also is encouraged to bookmark flooding information, water levels and other resources found on the district’s website at www.sjrwmd.com/localgovernments/flooding/.“Prepare now for the effects of Hurricane Irma and make good decisions for your family’s safety,” said St. Johns River Water Management District Executive Director Dr. Ann Shortelle. “As you do, our website is an excellent resource for information and links to flood statements and warnings, river stages, and local government emergency contacts. Meantime, district staff stand ready to assist each other and are prepared to assist our local government partners and other regional and state agencies as needed.”Local governments are the primary entities responsible for emergency responses during storms, such as implementing state-of-emergency declarations, evacuations and rescue efforts during flood-related disasters. The district may assist local governments in their recovery efforts .With the storm quickly approaching, the district urges property owners to take precautions and to prepare for the likelihood of significant flooding and other impacts. Homeowners can prepare their properties for heavy rains by:Keeping debris out of storm drains and ditches;Reporting clogged ditches to local governments;Cleaning out gutters and extending downspouts at least four feet from structures; andBuilding up the ground around the home to promote drainage away from the foundation.Here is a summary of the district’s current status:Effective Thursday evening, all district lands closed to public access and recreation. They will remain closed until the staff have time to assess and clean up properties after the storm. For information about district operations, visit www.sjrwmd.com.All district offices are closed Friday and Monday for storm preparation. Depending on the storm’s impacts, further closures may be necessary and will be posted on the district’s website.Several public meetings originally set for early next week, including the September Governing Board meeting, have been postponed. The Governing Board meeting is rescheduled for 4:30 p.m., Sept. 19, followed by the tentative Fiscal Year 2017-2018 millage and budget hearing at 5:05 p.m.Water storage is available in both the Upper St. Johns River and Upper Ocklawaha River. Struc­tures, such as locks, spillways, pump stations, levees and canals, in the headwaters of the St. Johns River in Brevard and Indian River counties and in the Harris Chain of Lakes in Lake County are the only controls the district has of water levels. Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

A nation in mourning

first_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. October 8, 2017 at 8:51 pm The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Reply 2 COMMENTS Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Mama Mia LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSDon LindseyInspiration Previous articleMaking sense out of Las VegasNext articleIf not now, then when? Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Reply Don Lindsey is a follower of Christ, son, husband, father, and a survivor.  Originally from Dayton Ohio, and resident of Apopka for six years, Don sees his life as a dedication to his wife, parents, children, and community. Don, it seems that a person can’t turn on the tv, computer, or read a newspaper without learning about someone, somewhere, getting shot and either getting wounded, or their life taken too soon. I don’t have any answers either, and don’t know why this is happening way to often, or what can be done about it. Like you state, they can ban guns all they want, but acts of evil will still be committed. I think we both are realistic, when we confess that we don’t have all the answers. This mass shooting will be replayed over and over, again and again, because so many died and were wounded, but just look around here daily in Central Florida, and it is everyday that someone is a victim. Many of those daily victims don’t get a front page headline, or proper mourning for their lives they have lived upon this earth. I guess that is the way of the world. I find it encouraging though, that the hurricane has helped bring people together more so than normal. So there is always hope. I hope you will still do a story on the cat lady. I would like to hear about who she is, and all the details. I hope you are feeling better. Thanks, Don….Mama Mia October 8, 2017 at 5:49 pm InspirationBy: Don Lindsey.I had planned to make today’s column about an area organization that rescues cats and the lady who started the business. However, the events in Las Vegas last Sunday have me changing my direction. With 58 dead and hundreds more injured, our nation has once again found itself in a state of mourning, and I for one am wondering how many more need to lose their lives before we see that we’re the only ones who can stop these senseless acts of violence.No, I’m not talking about gun control.  I’ve never been a “gun person,” but I don’t believe that firearms are the issue.  Cain killed Abel with a rock, so in my opinion, we can ban all guns but if people want to carry out acts of evil, they will.  For me, guns are not the weapons of concern.  Hatred, division, and a self-absorbed way of looking at the world are our most significant issues, and unless we start being honest with each other and ourselves, they will be our downfall.We’re so divided over political, and personal differences that we keep missing our opportunity to live up to the potential that God had in mind when he created us.  This mindset has been the background of many of my columns, but in all honesty, I’m starting to see that as a society, we seem too driven by our own needs to grasp the damage we’re creating.And I can confess that I have the same issues.  I’ve been so caught up in myself that I genuinely am not sure who I am anymore.  When I experience those self-centered moments, it’s hard to see anything else.  I believe we’re all wired that way in some regard, but the answer to getting out of that mindset is simple.Just look around you.When we take a couple of minutes to force ourselves to look outside of our own lives, we see the people around us that we love.  For me looking at my kids this week has brought fear of the future they are being raised to live in, but it’s also given me a glimmer of hope that the next generation will see the power in unity and in that discovery will reduce, if not end the suffering we inflict on ourselves.   Another thing that has given me hope is the stories coming out of the Las Vegas massacre of people rallying around one another to get through the shooting.  The many acts of heroism that have been reported show the resolve that human beings have when under direst.  Why is that important?  For me, it’s because an example of how much we can do when we care about helping those around us.  Instead of being paralyzed by the fear of losing their own life, so many abandoned that fear and put helping those in need at the top of their priority list.  Now if we could just find a way to use that same situational awareness to help all the time instead of only when there is a tragedy, I believe that we could prevent the type of killings that we see unfold in our country.I don’t claim to have all of the answers.  I do not even have my own life figured out, but what I do know is that unless we find a way to come together quickly, instead of continually fighting amongst ourselves, then we will continue to be a nation in mourning. Very well put! Tara burgos Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 last_img read more

Research on how self-control works could help you stick with New…

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGStheconversation.com Previous articleThe partnership between Florida Hospital and the UCF Knights…Next articleThis new year – rethinking gratitude Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply By Marco A. Palma, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Director Human Behavior Laboratory, Texas A&M University, and first published on theconversation.comMany of us have already decided that things will be different in 2018. We’ll eat better, get more exercise, save more money or finally get around to decluttering those closets.But by the time February rolls around, most of us – perhaps as many as 80 percent of the Americans who make New Year’s resolutions – will have already given up.Why does our self-control falter, so often leaving us to revert to our old ways? The answer to this question has consequences beyond our waistlines and bank balances.Psychologists and economists have traditionally fallen into two seemingly contradictory camps about how self-control works. But recent research conducted by my colleagues and me suggests the two sides of self-control might both be at play in each of us.Self-control: A battery or a snowball?A well-known series of experiments conducted at Stanford University in the 1960s and ’70s asked children to choose between getting one marshmallow right away or waiting a few minutes and getting two marshmallows. Researchers found that the children who waited patiently, able to resist eating that first marshmallow even when no one else was around, tended to do better throughout life in terms of SAT scores and educational attainment, employment, health and other major measures of success.For those kids, self-control – not how intelligent, wealthy or educated their families were, or any other identified factor – was the main driver of their later success. In other words, the ability to delay gratification helps in virtually all aspects of life.But researchers have had trouble nailing down where self-control comes from and how it works. For decades, studies of self-control in short-term decision-making have led to two clear, but seemingly contradictory, results.One model suggested that self-control is a finite resource that can get used up if you lean on it too heavily, like a battery that loses its charge over time. Someone who resists the urge to eat a doughnut for breakfast, for example, might give in to the temptation of a cookie later in the afternoon. Each little demonstration of self-control throughout the day ends up exhausting the limited reserves.The alternative model suggested that exercising self-control can help you build up the skill. Not eating the doughnut might increase your motivation and confidence to stick with a healthy diet – like a snowball that gets bigger as it builds momentum rolling downhill.So is self-control something you run out of when it’s overtaxed? Or is it something that you get better at the more you “practice”? The debate continued as different research groups investigated the question in various ways – and came up with contradictory evidence for which model best explains the inner workings of self-control.Using biometrics to tell the whole storyPart of the problem has been how hard it is to conduct behavioral research. Traditional methods assume that test subjects fully understand the questions they’re asked and give honest answers. Unfortunately, researchers had no practical way of knowing whether this was the case, or whether they actually measured what they intended to.But here at the nation’s largest biometrics lab, my Texas A&M colleagues and I figured out a new way to investigate the question that didn’t rely on just what volunteers report to us.We designed a two-part experiment. First, we asked subjects to focus on a red bull’s-eye at the bottom of a computer screen for either six or 30 minutes. This task requires volunteers to exert self-control – it’s tempting to look away from the boring, unchanging bull’s-eye to the animated video playing elsewhere on the screen.Then subjects participated in a second laboratory task meant to measure impulsive buying: They could conserve a real US$5 cash endowment or purchase several household items on-site they hadn’t been looking to obtain. The task is analogous to going to the store and buying products that aren’t on your list. The idea is that self-control helps individuals reign in these impulse purchases.The bull’s-eye for subjects to focus on is at the bottom of the screen. In this image, eye tracking technology lets the researcher precisely monitor how many times, and when, subjects deviated from the instructions. Marco A. Palma, CC BY-NDOur innovation was that we did not have to assume people fully complied with the video-watching task – we were actually able to measure it via their physiological responses. By tracking eye movements, we could quantify very precisely when participants stuck to staring at the bull’s-eye – that is, when their self-control was keeping them on task. We also measured facial expression and brain activity for a clearer understanding of what was going on with each subject.Basically, we found that both sides of the self-control debate were right.For a while, most people could focus on the boring bull’s-eye. But they’d hit a fatigue point. After that, if subjects hung in there and still stuck with the task, they ended up exhausting their self-control “battery.” We could see this by looking at how many impulse buys they made in the second half of the study. If they’d pushed past the fatigue threshold in the previous task, they showed less self-control and ended up making more impulsive purchases. This pattern was shown in both what they “bought” in our experiment and also in the brain: The prefrontal cortex showed patterns indicative of impulse-buying behavior.On the other hand, subjects who eased off once they’d reached the fatigue threshold had a different experience. They remained in the “snowball” stage of self-control – they practiced the skill a bit, but didn’t overdo it to the point of exhaustion. In the next task, their brains didn’t exhibit the typical impulse-buying activity patterns. Exercising self-control on the bull’s-eye task, but not overdoing it, led to more self-control in our second task. These subjects did better at controlling impulse purchases than the other group of subjects who didn’t have the initial bull’s-eye-watching session that turned out to rev up self-control.Our study suggests that self-control has the qualities of both snowball and battery: Exhibiting self-control once makes it easier to do so again a short time later, but overdoing it initially makes us more likely to give up altogether.Understanding how to maximize self-control can help with that list of resolutions. Costello77/Shutterstock.comHow to make it past February 1Our new understanding of self-control provides lessons for sticking with those New Year’s resolutions.First, remember that slow and steady is best. If you want to get fit, start by walking around the block, not running five miles. Achieve enough to stay motivated, but don’t overdo it to the point of frustration. Don’t burn out your self-control battery.Second, remember that small acts of self-control build over time. Instead of drastically cutting all carbs or sugar out of your diet, consider giving up just one piece of bread or one can of soda per day. Over time, consuming fewer calories per day will result in gradual weight loss.And finally, realize that little acts of self-control in one area will improve your self-control in other areas. Getting traction with a healthier diet, for example, will increase your confidence and motivation to achieve another goal. As the self-control snowball gains some momentum, you’ll get better and better at sticking to your objectives.A more apt metaphor for our new understanding of self control is that it’s like a muscle. You can overdo it and exhaust it if you overexert yourself beyond your capabilities. But with consistent training it can get stronger and stronger. The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate last_img read more

Brian O’Driscoll and Jonny Wilkinson surprise some unsuspecting fans

first_imgThursday Jan 13, 2011 Brian O’Driscoll and Jonny Wilkinson surprise some unsuspecting fans Over the years fans have sporadically been treated to rugby tv ads. It doesnt happen too often, but when it does we’re usually curious to check them out. Today is the launch of an amusing new ad campaign that includes two rugby legends.For the first time ever, Brian ODriscoll and Jonny Wilkinson have come together in an ad campaign to help launch the new Gillette Fusion ProGlide. The two find themselves hiding in bathroom stalls, surprising unsuspecting rugby fans while hidden cameras roll.While hiding in stalls and jumping out at men isnt usually what these two do in their spare time, the reactions of some of the participants who were told they had to wash their hands before tasting pizza for a focus group is pretty amusing. “Ready to take the ProGlide Challenge??” is what the guys shout out as the victims all react differently to seeing these great players suddenly standing next to them.The ads will be be broadcast in the UK today for the first time, featuring on ITV, Sky Sports, ESPN, and C4 over the next few weeks. They’re only a few seconds long, but weve organised a behind the scenes build up that sets the tone and gets some of the reactions from not only the bemused men, but ODriscoll and Wilkinson themselves. One of the ads will then play after that. You can view more about the ads and the Gillette Fusion ProGlide, thats due to be released on the 25th January, on their Facebook page at Facebook.com/GilletteUKADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedDoctors Stunned: This Removes Wrinkles Like Crazy! (Try Tonight)Smart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

HSBC Lions Monthly – Episode 2

first_imgMonday Feb 4, 2013 HSBC Lions Monthly – Episode 2   Last month we featured the first in a series that will lead up to what is arguably the most anticipated rugby event of the year, the British & Irish Lions tour of Australia. Each month HSBC will be bringing you updates and features as the excitement builds ahead of what some are calling a must win tour for the Lions, having not won a series since 1997.In this month’s Lions Monthly:  – Warren Gatland interview in Australia following the Lions Coaching Team announcement– Former Wallaby utility back Joe Roff reminiscing about the 2001 Lions tour– Behind-the-scenes Total Rugby chat with Brian O’Driscoll, including some Gavin Henson ‘secrets’– Jason Robinson teaching young people from the Prince’s Trust the benefits of playing rugbyHas your ideal Lions XV selection changed following the opening round of the Six Nations?ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error British & Irish Lions 2013 Related Articles 235 WEEKS AGO Warren Gatland confirms British & Irish Lions… 399 WEEKS AGO Brian O’Driscoll’s incredible skill at training… 413 WEEKS AGO Montage of Amazing Lions Test series in Australia,… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more